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DNA

HEALING HEADLINES


 

FORGET AN ARMAGEDDON CHANGE FOR THE WORLD

EMBRACE A DNA HEALING CHANGE FOR THE WORLD 

Christianity tells us that God is sending destruction in the form of Armageddon.

But just the opposite is happening.

 

From Eta Carina is coming an adjustment of DNA.

The Genetic Strand is being changed by laser light being emitted by Eta Carina.

If you would like to see the documentation concerning Eta Carina please :

CLICK HERE to go to The Genetic Page


 

ETA CARINA AND HEALING DNA

A Brief Explanation Concerning Eta Carina

 

Eta Carina is the only star in the visible sky that scientists

do not understand.

 

Carina means The Keel Of A Ship.

Carina was named for the keel of the ship Argo in the Greek Myth. 

 

THE KEEL OF THE SHIP SPOKE

In the Greek myth, it was the Keel Of The Ship Argo, that told Jason

where he could find the Golden Fleece.

Finding the Golden Fleece was important,

because everyone it touched was healed.

 

THIS MYTHOLOGY SPEAKS TO US NOW

Greek Mythology speaks in a hidden language

about universal cosmic things.

 

There was no ship Argo. There was no Golden Fleece that healed.

 Of course the keel of the ship could not talk. It was wood.

So what was that myth talking about?


NOW IN OUR AGE

THE KEEL OF THE SHIP IS TALKING

The most bizarre star nebula in history is drawing attention

of scientists and astronomers everywhere.

 

It is the Keel Of The Ship Eta Carina and it is sending energy

to the earth that can impact DNA healing.

 

The Keel of the ship spoke and gave instructions for healing

 in the ancient myth.

 

Eta Carina is fulfilling that prophetic myth and giving instructions

to scientists in this magnificent age of Aquarius.

 

If you go to the Hidden Meanings home page,

you will find links to Eta Carina pages so you can be brought up to date

on why I feel that Eta Carina is the Keel of the Ship that will lead

science to the Golden Fleece of DNA.

 


NOW THE DNA

HEALING HEADLINES


GENE THERAPY MAY IMPROVE BRAIN CANCER TREATMENT

BY PATRICIA REANEY, LONDON (REUTERS)

British scientists are working on new gene therapy techniques to

improve brain cancer treatments and to predict how women with

breast cancer will respond to treatment.

 

Researchers at Britain's Institute of Cancer Research and the

Royal Marsden Hospital are testing a technique to switch on inactive

chemotherapy drugs to kill cancerous cells.

So far results of laboratory tests have been encouraging.

"Were seeing substantial cell death,"

Dr. Gill Ross, one of the leaders of the program, told reporters.

 

Brain tumors are among the most difficult cancers to treat because

many types are resistant to radiotherapy, and chemotherapy drugs

have a limited effect on brain tissue.

 

There are also no screening tests to identify risk factors for the illness,

which strikes an estimated 40,000 people in the European union each year.

 

Nearly half of  the patients with brain cancer die within a year of their initial diagnosis.

 

In the so-called "pro-drug" therapy, the scientists inject bacterial genes,

wrapped in a virus, directly into the tumor.

The genes trigger an enzyme in the tumor cells which switch on the inactive

chemotherapy treatment.

 

Preliminary laboratory data in tumor types suggest that this

pro-drug therapy approach is not only feasible, but also effective,

certainly under laboratory conditions said Ross.

 


MUTANT GENE MAY CAUSE BACK PAIN

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK (AP) Researchers have identified a mutant gene that may be

responsible for a severe kind of back pain caused by ruptured disks in the spine,

a finding that could lead to new treatment.

 

Back pain has long been one of the most poorly understood disorders,

though it affects most adults at some point in their lives.

The new research was published in today's Science magazine and reported

by The Wall Street  Journal.

 

This study conducted with scientists at the University of Oulu in Finland,

analyzed the DNA of 180 Finnish patients with Sciatica.

Nine patients were found to have the mutation, and one of the 230 patients

in a control group without back pain had it.

 

The DNA of the extended families of four of the nine patients with

the defect revealed a total of 23 relatives with the mutation all of whom

suffered disk problems, indicating that the defect likely causes back trouble.

.


SCIENTISTS TURN GOOD CELL CANCEROUS

BY DAVID KINNEY, THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Researchers for the first time have created a cancerous human cell

by genetically altering a normal one-an important step toward developing drugs

that could one day wipe out cancer.

 

Scientists already know that cancer is caused by genes turned bad,

and they have been trying to develop drugs that fix these flaws.

Until now. they have been fumbling in the dark.

 

They aren't sure exactly which combinations of flaws cause the many

types of cancer.

Nor do they know precisely which drugs repair which faulty genes.

 

But biologists at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Whitehead Institute

for Biomedical Research showed that they can create a cancerous cell

with specific genetic flaws in the lab.

The next stop is trying to find drugs that correct those errors.

 

The work led by MIT's Dr. Robert Weinberg, was reported in today's

issue of The Journal Of Nature.

 

This provides a laboratory tool, and it's a significant one" , said Curt Harris,

chief of the National Cancer Institute's Human Carcinogenesis Lab.

Moshe Yaniv, a cancer researcher at France's Pasteur Institute,

called Weinbergs work a landmark paper.

 

By using this latest breakthrough, scientists can work backwards.

They can take, say, human breast cells, genetically alter them

and see what happens.

That way, they can identify some of the major genetic changes

that cause breast cancer.

 


GENETIC FLAW MAY TRIGGER SLEEP DISORDER

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

BOSTON: Scientists believe they have discovered a genetic flaw deep

within the brain that causes narcolepsy, the bizarre disorder that makes

people fall asleep without warning.

 

Two groups of scientists working independently found that narcoleptics

overwhelming urge to fall asleep may result from a glitch in signals sent

between cells in the hypothalamus, a part of the brain that

regulates appetite and other basic drives.

 


SUDDEN CARDIAC DEATH

HEALTH AND FITNESS NEWS SERVICE

For the first time there seems to be clear evidence that

sudden cardiac death in men runs in families.

 

Although researchers have long known that a person's genetic blueprint

contributes to his or her heart attack risk, this is the first study to

identify a genetic risk for sudden cardiac death.

 


CHOLESTEROL GENE

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

After a four decade search, scientists have identified a gene

that regulates the body's level of so called good cholesterol,

a breakthrough that could someday lead to a new way to treat one of the

most common causes of heart disease.

 

Flaws in a gene known as ABC1 prevent the production of a protein

that the body needs to rinse excess bad cholesterol and other fats out

of cells and the blood stream.

 


GENETICS AND  HEMOPHILIA

USA Today: Reporter Tim Friend

Headline: GENETIC DEFECT REPAIRED WITH SYNTHETIC CODE

Technique could permanently correct disorders such as

hemophilia in humans.

 

Scientists report they have for the first time permanently repaired a

genetic disease in animals with a single drug infusion.

They will test the treatment for humans next year.

 

The achievement detailed in today's Proceedings of the

National Academy of Sciences holds implications for disorders from i

nherited single gene defects such as hemophilia,

sickle cell anemia and thalassemia (chronic anemia) experts say.

 


GENETICS AND ALZHEIMERS

Time Magazine:

Adding More Of A Single Gene

The Gene NR2B hisps build a protein called NMDA which acts as a

receptor to specific chemical signals.

These chemical signals train brain cells to fire in repeating patterns,

the patterns are what we experience as memories.

 

A Super Mouse genetically engineered by scientists at Princeton,

MIT, and Washington University  whose DNA was cleverly altered  

gives scientists rise to consider that the genetic enhancement of

mental and cognitive attributes such as intelligence and

memory in mammals is feasible.

 

Scientists have applied to the FDA for permission to do experiments

with advanced Alzheimer patients.

 


 

GENETICS AND ASTHMA

Reuters News Service:

Reporter Michael Kahn

 San Francisco: Scientists have identified two genes that contribute

to the development of asthma which could help reduce susceptibility

to attacks, researchers said Monday.

 

A new study suggests that just a subtle tweaking of the two newly

identified genes could be the key to offering relief to those suffering

from the respiratory ailment.

 


NEW DRUGS

USA Weekend: www.injersey.com  

We'll have a whole new arsenal of medicines for diseases that are

currently untreatable says Carl Feldbaum president of the

Biotechnology Industry Organization.

 

Diseases such as Alzheimers and multiple sclerosis will be treated and

perhaps reversed by isolated molecules.

 

Patents will be able to rely on the efficacy of new genetically targeted drugs.

 


CANCER TREATMENT

USA Weekend  www.injersey.com

 

 Imagine one of our leading killers reduced to the status of strep throat.

Cancer deaths are expected to drop 21% by 2015 with 13% fewer

people ever getting cancer.

 

Vaccines that inoculate infants against liver cancer, and women against cervical cancer.

 

Drugs will hone in on the cancer via vitamins or drugs engineered to an individuals

genetic makeup.

 

Tumors will starve when antiangiogenesis drugs squelch

new blood supply to cancer cells.

 


BACTERIA GENE PATTERN DECIPHERED

 

Washington AP. Scientists have deciphered the gene pattern of a

bacteria that commonly causes meningitis and researchers

said it may help in the development of new vaccines.

 

In a study appearing Friday in the Journal Of Science, American,

British and Italian researchers report they have sequenced the genome,

or genetic pattern, of a meningococcus bacterial

called Neisseria meningitis, Type B


U.S. TEAM REVERSES MOUSE DIABETES

By Maggie Fox, Health and Science Correspondent

 

Washington Feb 26 (Reuters). Scientists said on Monday they had

used stem cells -"master cells" that are the source of new cells

in the body to reverse diabetes in mice.

 

They said their experiment is a first demonstration that the cells are as

valuable as people had said they would be in treating disease.

 

The team at the University of Florida in Gainesville said it has already

started testing human cells in the laboratory and think they will work too

.

To reverse diabetes you need to  take a transplant of the whole pancreas of the islets,

 Dr Desmond Schatz a professor pediatrics and a diabetes expert at Florida who

worked on the experiment said in a telephone interview.

Here the potential is you can take stem cells, grow them up ,

and they grow into islets that are capable of reversing disease.

 

The next step is to take this into humans, Schatz said.

In preliminary experiments it appears that we can take human pancreatic

duct cells and show that they can differentiate into islet cells as well.

 


 

SKIN CANCER  BREAKTHROUGH

 

LONDON (June 10) - Scientists have determined that a spontaneous

change in a certain gene is involved in 70 percent of cases of melanoma,

the deadliest form of skin cancer, which kills nearly 40,000 people a year worldwide.



Experts say the finding might lead to more effective drugs for melanoma,

which accounts for just 11 percent of skin cancer, but is hard to treat once

it has spread and accounts for almost all deaths from skin cancer.



Dr. Paul Meltzer, a senior cancer genetics investigator at the

U.S. National Human Genome Research Institute called the finding the

biggest breakthrough in melanoma research for many years.



The discovery, published Sunday in the online version of the

Journal Of Nature, is the first fruit of the Cancer Genome Project,

a spin-off of the international Human Genome Project being run by

researchers at the Welcome Trust Sanger Institute in Cambridge, England.



Cancer is the disease that lends itself best to an analysis of the human genome

because all cancers are a disease of DNA, said Mike Stratton,

head of the Cancer Genome Project, which aims to identify which of the

30,000 human genes are involved in cancer and how.



Genes are made up of a DNA code, represented by a sequence of letters.

A mutation occurs when the order of the letters changes.

Mutations can be acquired in two ways: either when DNA is damaged by

such toxins as radiation, chemicals or viruses, or when mistakes are

made before cell division.



Each cell in the body contains a copy of the genome, and duplicates

it before it divides into two.

The copy isn't always perfect.



Most of the mutations are harmless.

However, sometimes a mutation will occur in a particular cell in a key gene

and the result will be that the gene will be either switched on or switched off.

That cell will then start to behave abnormally.

It will divide when it should stop dividing.

It will move out of its usual position in a tissue and may even float

off into the bloodstream and deposit in another organ.



That is how cancer evolves.

Experts estimate it takes about 25 years from the first gene mutation

for a tumor to appear in an adult.



``With the human DNA sequence now available to us,

we have started the lengthy and daunting task of trawling through the

vast tracts of genome, gene by gene, to see if we can find the abnormal genes

that drive cells to behave as cancers,''

said Dr. Andy Futreal, a leader of the Cancer Genome Project.



Meltzer, who was not involved with the research, said the melanoma

finding raises great hopes that the ambitious Cancer Genome Project will pan out.



The scientists start by looking at the genes in 48 tumor samples comprising

six common cancers. They take each one of the 30,000 genes of the human

genome in each sample and look for abnormalities.



After that, they look at the suspect genes in a further 1,000 samples of

cancerous tissue, derived from nearly every type of human cancer, to see

how important a role the gene mutation plays.



The first abnormality they have found is in the gene called B-RAF,

which is one of a chain of genes that must all be switched to the

``on'' position for a cell to grow and divide.



Normally, it switches on and off, but the scientists found that the mutation

makes the gene stay switched on all the time and ignore prompts to turn itself off.

The cells with the mutation keep multiplying unchecked, leading to cancer.



The researchers found that the code letters in the B-RAF gene were

shuffled in 70 percent of melanoma cases, making it the most frequently

messed up gene in melanoma.



The scientists also found that about 10 percent of colon cancers had mutations

in the B-RAF gene and less frequently in a variety of other cancer types.



Stratton said that because the B-RAF mutation was found in 70 percent of

melanoma cases and because the fault in the gene is so specific,

it is a promising target for a new melanoma drug, which would be designed

to switch off the gene only in cells with a mutated version



``We're very excited, but we have to temper that with a certain amount of caution.

 

Cancers are devious beasts, they are unpredictable beasts.

They don't always respond in the way we would like them to,'' Stratton said. `

`We should be optimistic but we should recognize that the path will take several years.''
 


Study Links Six More Genes With Breast Cancer

By Maggie Fox

WASHINGTON, June 13 (Reuters) - Doctors checking into the genetic

causes of a rare children's cancer syndrome said on Thursday they had

shown a cluster of six genes lies behind not only the childhood cancer,

but many cases of breast cancer.



They believe they may have found a complex genetic pathway that causes cancer

in many families, and hope their finding may help identify people most at risk,

and perhaps lead to the development of targeted drugs to treat them.
 



 

                                                              

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INDEX

 

Associated Press David Kinney

David Kinney

Bioitechnology Industry Organization     Carl Feldbaum

Carl Feldbaum

Britain Institute Of Cancer Research

 

Cancer Genome Project  Dr Andy Futreal

Dr Andy Futreal

Images Google unless otherwise noted

 

Journal of Nature,  MIT  Dr. Robert Weinberg

Dr. Robert Weinberg

Massachussetts Institute Of Technology Whitehead Institute Biomedical Research

 

National Academy of Science

 

National Cancer Institute   Curt Harris

Curt Harris

National Human Genome Research Institute,  Dr Paul Meltzer

Dr Paul Meltzer

Pasteur Institute  France   Moishe Yaniv

Moishe Yaniv

Princeton University

 

Reuters News Service  Michael Kahn

Michael Kahn

Reuters News Service London Patricia Reaney

Patricia Reaney

Reuters News Service Maggie Fox

Maggie Fox

Royal Marsden Hospital England   Dr. Gil Ross

Dr. Gil Ross

University of Florida Gainsville, Dr Desmond Schatz

Dr Desmond Schatz

University of Oulu in Finland

 

USA Today   Tom Friend

Tom Friend

USA Weekend  www.injersey.com

 

Wall Street Journal

 

Washington University

 

Welcome Trust Sanger Institute Cambridge England    Mike Stratton

Mike Stratton